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Tuesday, June 19, 2007

Restoring Windows Shares

This is a repost from June 2005

Well, it inevitably happens that a large fileserver is being replaced, goes down, or goes bad and you have to restore it. Well if you are restoring to the same type of hardware then life is beautiful and NT/2000/2003 has no problems and acts like the good little boy it should be, but what happens when you have to restore to new hardware, or are refreshing the server to a newer more powerful server? This is when NT can be worse than that bratty little kid I wanted to strangle in the movie Problem Child. Personally John Ritter should have shot him and buried him in the back yard, but I digress. So how can you restore Shares or any other piece of the registry with TSM when NT doesn't like having the registry of another machine of different hardware restored? Well that's were a little ingenuity and some preemptive strategy comes in handy. The easiest way is to setup a script using the command line registry tool REG.EXE that runs a REG EXPORT KEYNAME each day and stores it as a file. Here is the string needed to backup the Shares key. (The following is all one line)

REG EXPORT HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\LanmanServer\Shares C:\BACKUP\SHARESEXP.TXT

The command backs up the Shares key to a folder I created on the C: drive called Backup, but you can put it wherever you like. A simple batch file will suffice to execute the export and you can either schedule it through Windows daily or through TSM. Yes, you can do that and TSM will gladly back it up. This allows you to then restore the export file and reimport it into the server of choice. Just make sure that with any schedule where you are executing a command/batch file you put the full path of the file or else TSM can possibly fail to execute it, even if its in the TSM BACLIENT directory.

Ok, not everyone has that process in place and needs to restore the Share key now! Well have no fear TSM can help you accomplish it. Let's look at the process for this situation and I'll provide some links. First off you can restore the registry without activating it. The command to do so is

RESTORE REGISTRY -ACTIVATE=NO (for Win2K/Win2003)

RESTORE REGISTRY ENTIRE -ACTIVATE=NO (for WinNT)

Now for each process you can restore specific keys but for ease of use the entire restore will work. TSM will restore the registery to the c:\adsm.sys\computername\ directory. From this point you can load the hive in RegEdit containing the share key and export it to a file. Once exported you should be able to import it into the current registry thereby restoring the shares. Here is a Microsoft document that covers loading the hive and processes to use. There is also a good document on backing up and restoring the registry here. If you have any questions feal free to comment and I'll respond as soon as possible.

3 comments:

  1. Why not create a file with the "net share" command and back it up, when you then need to restore the shares on any machine, just edit the file and put the net share command in front of the shares, make sure the file has the .bat extansion and run it...

    just my 2 cents

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  2. Sounds good to me, although I have never used it. If you would like to write it up I'll give you access to post it.

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  3. Hi Chad,

    Just to clarify (as it isn't foolproofly implicit in the post), what we're trying to do here is to workaround the fact that TSM, whilst (hopefully) restoring the filesystem objects perfectly well, won't restore any Windows shared folder information etc as these attributes aren't stored along with the file objects themselves but only in the registry.

    Is there any other stuff, other than shares, that TSM won't back up/restore that that we all need to be aware of?

    Cheers,

    David McClelland
    London, UK

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